About

1. Cities are the focal point of my work. They are composed of various and tangled networks, the overlappings of which represent constantly shifting sites of urban encounters. These urban networks offer spaces where objects collide with other objects. I document and collect the traces of these encounters—the side-effects and the supporting objects. I pay attention to their particularities, to their emotional impact and signification. Then I reformat them in my studio practice. I present objects as they seem to be themselves--fractured, spliced, and strangely interconnected. I reposition these objects into new, looser networks that reflect the kaleidoscopic urban world where I found them.


2. I consider it necessary to attempt to contact the subjects (musicians, politicians, athletes) implicated in my artworks. Sometimes they respond, sometimes not. Here are three notable responses:
2016. New Found Land, a Berlin-based music duo shared a photograph of my work on their Instagram.
2014. Hungarian senator Olah Lájos, mid-handshake following a Budapest campaign rally nodded at my disclosure---I was working on an artwork using photographs of his posters.
2013. After photographing election campaign posters of Serbian Nationalist Party candidate Vojislav Seselj in Novi Sad, I self-published a photo-book and mailed a copy to the detention office of Mr. Seselj, who was at the time in U.N. confinement in The Hague under suspicion for alleged war crimes. In 2014 I received a form letter confirming the receipt of the package.


3. Exploring the Berlin neighborhood of Kreuzberg I found a pervasive urban mass of printed posters, flyers, bills, and other papers glued onto city walls, bus stations, overpasses, and signboards. Not only a physical “skin”, but a semiotic epidermis as well, this paper layer bears the indexical marks of a vibrant population.
In May and June I noticed a number of posters advertising watch-parties for the German team’s matches during European Championship 2016. Featured on these black-and-white posters striker Thomas Müller stared blankly forward, blood streaming from his nose and mouth.
I collected four of these posters on a street near my apartment. Two released easily from the rain-dampened wall, while the others ripped in pieces as the wheat-paste held in some areas. It was clear to me then--not only has Herr Müller been internally injured from his leap from soccer pitch through computer screen into the physical world as a street poster, but with my effort to collect the posters I further ruptured his urban incarnation by tearing its paper substrate.
Returning to my studio I began an emergency surgical procedure. Since it was a photographic digital process that transmuted Müller from human form to poster referent it seemed natural to reverse this system. Carefully I dissected each poster into pixels, and following algorithmic instructions for generative image-stitching, I recombined the pieces into an idiosyncratic pattern designed to result in the German footballer’s reanimation into moving, kicking, form...

About